MIAA Names former MNS Natural Freshman of the Year

StephanieGoodwin-Story2012-2Former Mac-N-Seitz Natural Stephanie Goodwin was named freshman of the year posting a .433 batting average along with 7 homeruns and 41 RBIs for Emporia State University. Stephanie who played for Bill Garton is leading the team in many areas to help them head to their 9th straight NCAA tournament. Congratulations Stephanie continue to make us proud.

http://www.esuhornets.com/news/2012/4/26/SB_0426123417.aspx?path=softball

StephanieGoodwin-Story2012

Holovach Earns Big 12 Weekly Honor

Holovach2012a

Originally published on March 26, 2012 on MUTIGERS.com

COLUMBIA, Mo. – Mizzou southpaw Blake Holovach (Overland Park, Kan.) has been named Big 12 Newcomer of the Week, as announced by the league office on Monday afternoon (March 26). The honor for Holovach is the first Big 12 weekly honor in his career and the second for the Tigers this season after Dane Opel (Edwardsville, Ill.) earned Big 12 Player of the Week following the Tigers’ season-opening series win at Auburn.

Holovach was the Tigers’ Saturday starter in their Big 12-opening series against Oklahoma State and he turned in another gem. He finished one out away from his second consecutive complete game as he went 8.2 innings, allowing just one unearned run on five hits and two walks. He extended his shutout streak to 15.2 innings before the Cowboys tagged him with an unearned run in the seventh inning of the Tigers’ 4-1 win at Taylor Stadium. He struck out four batters in the start.

After starting the season and struggling in the bullpen, Holovach has been one of the nation’s top pitchers this season as he is 4-0 with a 0.61 ERA in four starts since being moved to the weekend rotation. He has thrown 29.1 innings in those four starts, striking out 20 and walking just seven. He is holding opposing batters to a .163 batting average as a starter and owns a WHIP of 0.92 and has allowed just 17 hits in 29.1 innings of work. In fact, Holovach has not surrendered an earned run in his last 17.2 innings of work, the longest active streak in the Big 12 and the second-longest by any Big 12 pitcher this season.

Overall, Holovach is sixth in the Big 12 in ERA (1.97), third in wins (four) and eighth in opposing batting average (.217). Holovach and the Tigers will return to action this week at Taylor Stadium as they host Central Arkansas in a two-game series on Tuesday and Wednesday. The games are set for 6 p.m. and 1 p.m., respectively.

David Wiedeman Honored By The Patriot League

Story originally published 02/20/2012 on www.navysports.com

DavidWiedemanANNAPOLIS, Md. – The Patriot League honored a pair of Navy baseball players on Monday as Ben Nelson was named the conference Pitcher of the Week and freshman shortstop David Wiedeman was named Player of the Week. For Nelson, it is his second-career Patriot League Pitcher of the Week accolade.

In Navy’s season opening 3-1-victory over North Carolina A&T last Friday, Nelson held the Aggies to three hits and didn’t allow a run in his six and two-thirds innings of work. The native of Winter Springs, Fla., struck out six and didn’t issue a walk as he picked up the 12th win of his career.

Wiedeman posted a batting average of .364 (4-for-11) in the three-game series against North Carolina A&T. The freshman from Leawood, Kan., posted a team-high five RBIs on the weekend and also scored two runs.

Wiedeman is the first Navy freshman to be named Patriot League Player of the Week since Mike Gaudagnini on April 28, 2008.

Navy will be back in action Wednesday when it hosts Maryland Eastern Shore at 2 p.m. in the 2012 home opener.

Ryne Stanek Named All-American

(Originally posted on ArkansasRazorbacks.com by Chad Crunk, Athletic Media Relations)

RyneStanekAllAmericanFAYETTEVILLE – A trio of sophomores from the No. 4 Arkansas Razorback baseball team were named preseason All-Americans by Baseball America, it was recently announced.

Nolan Sanburn, Dominic Ficociello and Ryne Stanek were each selected for the teams, which are voted on by Major League Baseball scouting directors. Sanburn was a first-team selection, while Ficociello and Stanek were each picked for the third team.

A native of Kokomo, Ind., Sanburn led the Razorbacks and ranked sixth in the Southeastern Conference with eight saves last season. A Collegiate Baseball freshman All-America in 2011, Sanburn finished his rookie season with a 2-4 record and a 3.62 ERA in 24 relief appearances. Sanburn, who was drafted in the 34th round of the 2010 MLB Draft by the Detroit Tigers, struck out 35 batters in 32.1 innings and held opposing hitters to a .239 batting average last season. Sanburn is on the preseason watch list for the 2012 NCBWA Stopper of the Year Award, which goes to the top relief pitcher in the nation.

A 23rd round draft pick of the Detroit Tigers in the 2010 MLB Draft, Ficociello led the Arkansas offense with a .335 batting average with four homers and a team-high 50 RBI in 2011. A native of Fullerton, Calif., Ficociello also led the Razorbacks in hits (75), doubles (15), multi-hit games (20) and multi-RBI games (14). Ficociello’s 75 hits tied an Arkansas freshman single-season record. Following the season, Ficociello was named a consensus freshman All-American. An All-SEC Freshman Team selection, Ficociello hit .314 with two homers and 18 RBI against league competition. Defensively, Ficociello finished the season with a .968 fielding percentage en route to being named to the All-SEC Defensive Team.

A native of Overland Park, Kan., Stanek appeared in 15 games, including 12 starts, in his freshman season and finished the year with a 4-2 record with one save and a 3.94 ERA. Stanek, who was drafted by the Seattle Mariners in the third round of the 2010 MLB Draft, had his two best outings of the 2011 season in the postseason. In the SEC Tournament against Alabama, Stanek gave up just one run on two hits and struck out five in 7.2 innings to earn the win. A week later in the NCAA Tempe Regional, Stanek picked up his first complete game, going the distance against New Mexico and allowing three runs, two earned, on six hits with a career-high tying six strikeouts.

The Razorbacks open the 2012 season on Friday, February 17, at 3:05 p.m. against Villanova at Baum Stadium. Season tickets for Arkansas’ 36-game home schedule are now on sale. Season tickets are $190 for adults and $140 for University of Arkansas staff, youth and senior citizens. Tickets may be purchased by calling 1-800-982-HOGS (4647) or by visiting the online ticket center at ArkansasRazorbacks.com.

Ryne Stanek

Ryne Stanek is a Mac-N-Seitz alum who currently plays for the University of Arkansasrynestanek

High School: Blue Valley High School, KS

College: Arkansas

Drafted: 3rd round pick of the 2010 draft  by the Seattle Mariners but did not sign and stayed with Arkansas.

Scouting Report: Ryne Stanek is a 2010 RHP with a 6’4”, 180 lb. frame from Overland Park, KS who attends Blue Valley HS. Slender young build, minimal present strength. Clean delivery, drives to the plate, long loose arm action, 3/4’s release, good out front. FB steady upper 80’s, projects more in future.

CB shows nice sharpness, big 2-plane break, potential plus pitch, tends to aim CB to LHH’ers, good feel for change up. Good 3 pitch mix with idea on command, should continue to get stronger. Showed ability with the bat, some power potential.

When scouts saw Stanek’s 6-foot-4, 180 pound build and his ability to maintain a 90-92 mph fastball on the showcase circuit last summer, it was easy for them to project that he might throw in the mid-90s one day. That day came sooner than expected, as Stanek worked at 91-96 mph in his first game this spring. He kept that velocity all spring, doing so with little effort.  Stanek is one of the cornerstones of a deep Arkansas team.

Logan Morrison

Justis Logan Morrison (born August 25, 1987, in Kansas City, Missouri) is a Major League Baseball left fielder for the Florida Marlins and a Mac-N-Seitz alumni. Entering the 2010 baseball season, Morrison is considered by Baseball America to be the #2 prospect in the Marlins farm system, and the #20th overall prospect. He played in the 2010 MLB All-Star Futures Game in Anaheim, California. On July 27, 2010, he was called up to the Major Leagues by the Marlins, and made his debut that night.

Early Life

Morrison was drafted after his senior year (2005) in high school by the Florida Marlins in the 22nd Round, but decided to attend Maplewoods (MO) Community College, and was signed as a draft-and-follow prior to the 2006 MLB Amateur Draft.

College Highlights

In his freshman year, Morrison batted .436 with 9 home runs, 45 RBIs. He led the Monarchs with a .532 OB%, .743 SLG% & 1.275 OPS with a 29-13 BB-K ratio. He made only 3 errors, good for a .977 fielding percentage.

Minor League Career

In 2007, Morrison batted .267 with 24 home runs, 86 RBIs, 71 runs scored, and 22 Doubles in 128 games played. He was named a South Atlantic League Mid-Season All-Star.

In 2008, Morrison batted .332 with 13 HR, 74 RBIs, and 38 doubles for the Class High A Jupiter Hammerheads. He led the entire Florida State League in batting average (.332), hits (162), doubles (38) & OB% (.402). His 241 total bases was good for 2nd best in the Florida State League. He finished 4th in the Florida State League in AB’s (488), 4th in OPS (.896), 5th in SLG% (.494), 6th in RBI (74), 7th in runs (71), 8th in HR (13) & 9th in BB (57). Morrison led the Jupiter Hammerheads in Games, AB’s, Runs, Batting Average, OB%, Triples, Walks, Total Bases, Doubles, OB%, OPS, and SLG%.

A broken bone in his right thumb limited Morrison to 79 games at Double-A in 2009, where he batted .277 with 8 HR, 47 RBIs, and 18 doubles.

In 2010, Morrison played for the Jupiter Hammerheads and New Orleans Zephyrs.

Major League Career

On July 27, 2010, the Florida Marlins called up Morrison to replace the injured Chris Coghlan. He went 1-4 that night, recording his first major league hit in his debut.

Personal Life

Morrison’s rookie year has a special significance because his father was battling lung cancer and passed away on December 8, 2010.  On December 9, 2010, Logan Morrison announced on his Twitter account that his father had died shortly after 9 p.m. the night before.

Riley Pint Regarded As No. 1 Prospect In 2016 MLB Draft

Riley Pint is a former Mac-N-Seitz player. The following story was originally published on NOLA.com. Written by Randy Rosetta.

It’s way too early to project the where and when with Riley Pint and a pro baseball career. There doesn’t seem to be much mystery, though, that the Kansas native and LSU commit will be a star at some point.

A few years from now when the 2016 Major League Baseball Draft rolls around, Pint figures to arrive at a crossroads with no undesirable path to choose from.

But the ultra-talented right-handed pitcher makes it very clear that there will be, without a doubt, multiple choices to consider.

“I’ve always dreamed about playing college baseball at LSU and pitching in the College World Series,” the junior at St. Thomas Aquinas in the Kansas City suburb of Lenexa said matter-of-factly. “That would be a dream come true for me. It’s definitely something that I am going to consider very seriously.”

Make no mistake about it, though: The Tigers and college baseball will have some serious competition.

Entering his junior season — which will have to wait a while because the 6-foot-4 Pint is also a prep basketball star — he is rated by PerfectGame.org as the No. 1 prospect for the 2016 draft.

That comprehensive list is the cream of the crop and includes current college players, with LSU sophomore pitcher Jared Poche (No. 15), another Tigers’ commit, right-handed pitcher Todd Peterson from Florida (No. 40) and freshman infielder and former Brother Martin standout Greg Deichmann (No. 94) also in the Top 100.

How did Pint wind up there? By turning in an extraordinary summer performance, particularly at the WWBA 17-and-under National Championship in Emerson, Ga.

With dozens of scouts and college coaches on hand at the July event, Pint stole the thunder from most of the rest of the players in the tournament, most of them a year older.

Playing for Mac-N-Seitz, a KC-based travel team operated by former Kansas City Royals players Mike MacFarlane and Kevin Seitzer, Pint exploded onto the national scene.

PerfectGame.org scout/analyst Jheremy Brown reported that Pint’s fastball touched 96 mph and hovered in the 91-94 range. While that is nasty enough on its own, Pint also turned heads with a variety of breaking pitches, one that Brown honed in on.

“As good as the velocity is and the projection, it’s the knuckle-curve that separates him, as it’s a plus-pitch with really good shape and velocity,” Brown wrote, noting that the unique pitch was clocked from 80-84 mph.

Pint said he learned the pitch from Macfarlane, a former catcher.

“I just stuck with it the whole time and really like the way I throw it,” he said in Brown’s report. “It just feels good coming out of my hand, so I just keep with it.”

Not that he strays too far from his bread-and-butter. Brown wrote that Pint’s 113th pitch in the game he scouted was a 94-mph strike.

That doesn’t surprise Pint’s high school coach at STA.

Lorne Parks, a 30-year coaching veteran, steered St. Thomas Aquinas to the Class 5A state championship last spring with Pint as a key component. He has played for the Saints’ varsity the last two seasons, going 3-2 with a 3.19 ERA and 35 strikeouts as a freshman and 8-0 with a 2.58 ERA and 59 Ks (in 57 innings) last season.

“He’s the kind of kid who is going to work as hard as he can to be the best no matter what he’s playing,” Parks said. “He’s a great athlete to begin with, but his work ethic makes him different than most other guys. He’s also great in the classroom – just a classy kid to have in your program.”

Which is what LSU coaches and fans are hoping can be said of Pint and the Tigers in a few years.

The relationship between the program and Pint blossomed while he was starring last summer, but he had LSU in mind long before that.

Growing up a few hours south of Omaha, Pint has been a regular visitor to the College World Series with his father Neil Pint, who played baseball at Iowa State. That means he is no stranger to the Tigers’ prominent place in the world of college baseball.

So when Pint met LSU pitching coach Alan Dunn and then first-year recruiting coordinator Andy Cannizaro, some dots were quickly and easily connected.

“LSU has always been a historic program and I always wanted to be a part of that tradition,” Pint said. “When I realized they were interested in me, it all kind of fell into place. It’s a dream for me to pitch in the College World Series and there’s no place better to do that than LSU.”

Dunn is also a big part of the equation.

Since he got to LSU, Dunn has tutored a pitching staff that has constantly been among the best in the country all four seasons and has been bolstered by the SEC Pitcher of the Year the last three — Kevin Gausman in 2012 and Aaron Nola each of the last two seasons.

Gausman was the No. 3 pick in the 2012 MLB Draft, while Nola went No. 7 last June.

“He was such a big impact on the recruiting process because he’s such a good coach,” Pint said. “His resume speaks for itself. You want to play for a guy like that when you get to this stage.”

Pint also wants to play in a program where he knows the competition will be stiff.

The Tigers’ current freshman class is anchored by five freshmen pitchers all likely to be drafted someday and four of them are in the mix for weekend starting spots in 2015, including Alex Lange, who also hails from the Kansas City area.

That’s the kind of environment Pint wants to step into.

“I’m looking forward to get the opportunity to be in contention with guys like that,” Pint said. “When I play there, I know I can compete with anybody.”

Will Pint ever be in that situation, though? That’s where the crossroads comes into play.

Barring a major injury, Pint should be a high draft pick in 2016, quite possibly a first-rounder.

If, like several of LSU’s current freshmen did, Pint makes it clear he wants to play college baseball, he could ostensibly price himself out of the first round. Or if the lure of pro ball is strong enough, Pint could let teams know what he expects as a signing bonus with LSU as a valuable bargaining chip.

“I don’t know what’s going to happen with the draft and LSU; that’s a family decision,” Parks said. “But I do know he’s always said that LSU is where he wants to go. There has never been a second choice. It just so happened that they came into the picture when they did because we had heard from several programs about him last year.”

Now, those calls have dried up because Pint caught the eye of the only college suitor he was interested in.

And sometime soon, the lanky young pitcher who already wears a size 14 shoe will start to weigh his options. But he won’t obsess over it between now and then. Not with two sports to keep him busy.

“I’m just going to let the process play out and see what happens,” he said. “It’s my dream to play in the College World Series for LSU, but it’s also my dream to play pro baseball. Whichever direction it takes me is where I’ll go.”

Chase Jans – Pitch, Hit, And Run Competition

Lorenzo Cain, Salvador Perez, Alcides Escobar, Alex Gordon, and Ned Yost won’t be the only Royals in the All Star Game. Twelve year-old Chase Jans, from Overland Park, will be representing Kansas City in the national Pitch, Hit and Run competition. The contest takes place next Monday before the major leaguers hold their All-Star workout at Great American Ball Park.

Chase plays for the Mac-N-Seitz 12U Indians Team

chasejans

MNS Pitcher Riley Pint on Phillies’ Radar

Story originally published on philly.com.  By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer

Riley PintFORT MYERS, Fla. – When Riley Pint walked a batter in his first inning at Perfect Game’s national showcase in June, there was a rumble of surprise among the hundreds of observing scouts.

In the buildup to this gathering of the nation’s best high school players, the lanky Kansan had been portrayed as some sort of baseball ideal, one without pitching or personal flaws.

His pre-showcase scouting report from Perfect Game, a website that ranks baseball prospects, raved about a fastball that reached 96 m.p.h. and a breaking ball that was even more impressive.

“As good as the velocity is,” wrote Jheremy Brown, “it’s the knuckle-curve that separates him.”

His high school coach spoke just as glowingly about Pint’s other attributes.

“His presence, his stature, how he handles himself, you don’t find that in young kids very often,” said coach Lorne Parks of St. Thomas Aquinas in Overland Park, Kan. “He handles himself well in the classroom. He comes to practice every day trying to improve. His work ethic is unbelievable. He’s just a classy, well-rounded young man.”

All of that – but especially the fastball and knuckle-curve – helped explain why for the last year Perfect Game has ranked the 17-year-old righthander in its top 3 high school prospects. No. 1 earlier this year, he’s No. 3 now, behind lefty Jason Groome of Barnegat, N.J., and California outfielder Blake Rutherford.

Such a lofty assessment means the Phillies will look long and hard at the 6-foot-4, 215-pounder between now and June, when for the first time since 1998 they will have the initial pick in the draft.

If the Phillies choose him, he will be the first high school righthander taken No. 1 overall. Regardless of how high he goes, Pint, who has committed to LSU, perhaps the nation’s top collegiate program, will have to be persuaded to forgo a dream.

“Ever since I was a little kid it’s been a goal of mine to play in the College World Series,” said Pint, a Lenexa, Kan., resident. “I really love this game. So whatever happens with the draft or LSU, I’m just glad I’ll be playing this game somewhere.”

The son of an Iowa State pitcher and a Kansas State women’s basketball player, Pint was hitting 90 on the radar gun as an Aquinas freshman. A veteran staff and a season limited to 20 games helped Parks resist the urge to overwork his ninth grader.

“I’d heard some hearsay about him and I talked to him when he first got here,” Parks said. “But when I finally got a look at him on the field, I was like, ‘Wow, this kid is going to be something special.’ ”

Aquinas’ coaches made some minor adjustments, directing his follow-through more toward home plate. He took off, going 8-0 as a sophomore.

“He was already a 93-94 guy his sophomore year,” Parks said. “His velocity has continued to go up. I just think that wherever he ends up his upside is tremendous.”

Riley Pint In the summer of 2014, at a showcase tournament, Pint jumped to the top of his class with a 113-pitch outing. What really impressed scouts was his consistency. The 16-year-old’s 113th pitch was clocked at 94 m.p.h.

He was up to 97 on occasion this summer, a jump in velocity that happened as his broad-shouldered body filled out.

Pint was also a basketball star at Aquinas but has decided to give up the game in his senior season. “That ought to help him keep the weight on and keep his velocity up,” Parks said.

The pitcher has dominated opponents in the talent-rich Kansas City area, at first with his fastball and then with the knuckle-curve he learned as a 9-year-old playing summer ball.

“I like the way it feels when it comes out of my hand,” he said.

On the elite Mac-N-Seitz travel team, a program run by ex-major-leaguers Mike Macfarlane and Kevin Seitzer, Pint learned the pitch from MacFarlane, the longtime Royals catcher.

“We wanted to teach him a pitch that doesn’t put a lot of stress on the elbow,” said Macfarlane, who has coached Pint for eight summers. “As he’s gotten older and bigger, he’s just been able to power through that pitch. You combine that with the change-up he throws and that velocity and it makes for a pretty special young pitcher.”

As the attention mounts, so has the pressure. But Parks insists that Pint is so well-grounded, he’s virtually immune.

“He hasn’t let all this stuff go to this head,” Parks said. “Not once has there been any arrogance. He takes it all in stride and tries to focus on what he needs to do – his bullpen sessions, his weight work and offseason conditioning.”

But, as that first-inning walk indicated, he’s not perfect. Pint sometimes fights his control.

“He had two losses last year,” noted Parks. “He struggles a little finding the strike zone at times. When that happens, hitters know he’s going to take something off his fastball and they sit on it.”

Usually, though, Pint auto-corrects. After that first-inning walk here, for example, his demeanor never changed. He blew away the next two hitters – both high school all-stars.

“You don’t see any change on the mound,” Macfarlane said. “He’s got a very even temperament. He keeps his cool.”

Colton Murray, former Mac N Seitz player and graduate of Olathe East gets called up to the Majors.

Story originally published on NJ.com

The Phillies decided upon an interesting cast of September call-ups with 25-man rosters opening up Tuesday.

The three newcomers include a reliever with no big-league time, a Cuban defector who debuted in the majors this season for two clubs and a catcher who has a history with the club.

Right-handed reliever Colton Murray, a 13th round draft pick in 2011 who excelled this season in Double-A and Triple-A, is a big-leaguer for the first time and will suit up for the Phillies’ game against the Mets on Tuesday night at Citi Field.

Also on board are right-handed reliever Dalier Hinojosa, who pitched briefly in the majors this season for the Boston Red Sox and Phillies, and catcher Erik Kratz, who rejoined the organization as a minor leaguer this summer.

Murray, 25, earned a shot by going 6-1 with a 2.52 ERA in 21 Double-A games for the Reading Fightin Phils and 2-2 with a 2.79 ERA in 31 Triple-A games for the Lehigh Valley IronPigs.

Hinojosa, 29, is in his second season since defecting from Cuba, most of it coming in Triple-A. He’s pitched well in his big-league opportunities, working a combined 6 2/3 scoreless innings over four outings, one for Boston and three with the Phillies.

The Phillies acquired Hinojosa off waivers from Boston on July 15. He had a brief call-up for the Phils in August.

Kratz, 35, hit 230 with 18 homers and 52 RBIs in 120 games for the Phillies from 2011-13, 93 as a starter. He bounced around this season, going from Kansas City to Boston to Seattle before signing a minor-league deal with the Phils on July 17.

The Phillies freed up space on their 40-man roster for Murray and Kratz by transferring injured pitchers Chad Billingsley and Matt Harrison from the 15-day to 60-day disabled list.

Story originally published on NJ.com

The Phillies decided upon an interesting cast of September call-ups with 25-man rosters opening up Tuesday.

The three newcomers include a reliever with no big-league time, a Cuban defector who debuted in the majors this season for two clubs and a catcher who has a history with the club.

Right-handed reliever Colton Murray, a 13th round draft pick in 2011 who excelled this season in Double-A and Triple-A, is a big-leaguer for the first time and will suit up for the Phillies’ game against the Mets on Tuesday night at Citi Field.

Also on board are right-handed reliever Dalier Hinojosa, who pitched briefly in the majors this season for the Boston Red Sox and Phillies, and catcher Erik Kratz, who rejoined the organization as a minor leaguer this summer.

Murray, 25, earned a shot by going 6-1 with a 2.52 ERA in 21 Double-A games for the Reading Fightin Phils and 2-2 with a 2.79 ERA in 31 Triple-A games for the Lehigh Valley IronPigs.

Hinojosa, 29, is in his second season since defecting from Cuba, most of it coming in Triple-A. He’s pitched well in his big-league opportunities, working a combined 6 2/3 scoreless innings over four outings, one for Boston and three with the Phillies.

The Phillies acquired Hinojosa off waivers from Boston on July 15. He had a brief call-up for the Phils in August.

Kratz, 35, hit 230 with 18 homers and 52 RBIs in 120 games for the Phillies from 2011-13, 93 as a starter. He bounced around this season, going from Kansas City to Boston to Seattle before signing a minor-league deal with the Phils on July 17.

The Phillies freed up space on their 40-man roster for Murray and Kratz by transferring injured pitchers Chad Billingsley and Matt Harrison from the 15-day to 60-day disabled list.